Great Benefits Of Small Grains

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Today’s diet is unnatural.  Artificial foods do not benefit the human body, nor do the farmers who produce the food. Cereals have played a major role in the traditional diet of the Tamils ​​in harmony with nature.

By knowing their history, virtues and medicinal benefits one can benefit and realize the superiority of small grains to the world. Small grains include millet, taro, rye, cashew (or) ragi, horse walnut, quail (snow), sorghum, and corn.

A Chinese folk song depicts the specialty of small grains that these lucky grains were sent from above for us.

These small grains have gradually disappeared from the Tamil diet. Today’s generation is unaware that there is a type of grain called small grains. It is a fact of life that people are unaware of the greatness of small grains. The pattern of rainfall has also changed due to environmental and climatic changes. Its impact has also affected rainfed crops. Farmers who produce small grain crops such as rainfed crops are also very rare

It is worth recalling here that William Dhar, director general of the International Food Crops Research Institute, said that rainfed crops had been pushed aside by the Green Revolution. Natural agriculture scientist R.S. Narayanan.

 

The effect?

Unheard of and bizarre diseases afflict people. This is the result of abandoning our traditional small grains and switching to a modern diet.

Fast food is the most harmful to our health. It has been found that fast food intake is the leading cause of obesity in children and teenagers. Small grains are said to be the food of the poor. Today they have become the food of the affluent, the food of the sick. If we look a little deeper into the food culture of the Indian people we can understand the important role of small grains in it. It can be said that small grains are making a comeback in the diet of Tamils.

Realizing the medicinal properties and importance of small grains, city dwellers have been searching for them. People are flocking to Khadi, Sarvodaya and Organic shops in large numbers. Farmers have now also volunteered to produce small grains.  Central and state governments have also started promoting rain-fed small grain food crops.

In ancient Tamil literature, small grains are given as kulam.  Small grains were cultivated in both Kurinji and Mullai lands.  Small grains are also called rainfed crops or Punjabi (Punjabi) crops. Cereals have played a major role in the traditional food culture of the Tamils.  Small grains have also played a role in worship. Millet flour was made for Lord Murugan and millet powder for Thirumal.

 

It is still customary for the rural people of Tamil Nadu to feed millet flour to the flowering women by pouring good oil on it.  Indigenous peoples of Tamil Nadu are familiar with and still use small grain farming methods. Small grains have been so important in fruit production because they are good for our body and beneficial for agriculture.  Each of the small grains has a unique history and special medicinal properties.

Millet (Foxtail Millet):

This grain is cultivated worldwide.  India is a major producer of millet.  Foods made with millet are very good for diabetics.  It is a Tamil tradition to give millet to mothers who have given birth. It is rich in protein, fiber, fat, minerals, iron and beta-carotene.

Barnyard Millet:

This grain can be grown in rainfed areas and gives high yields in a short period of time.  The ray of this crop is called ponytail because it looks like a horse’s tail.  Food cooked in horsetail grain is good for cleansing the body organs.  It has the property of controlling diabetes.

Tamarind (Little Millet):

Tamarind is a food suitable for all ages.  Safflower has many medicinal properties such as healing ulcers and preventing constipation.

Finger Millet:

Also known as Rocky in urban areas and Cape in the countryside.  It is said to be the food of the poor.  Cassava gives good firmness to the body and has the property of reducing body weight.  Very good for diabetics.

Rye (Pearl Millet):

This grain, which grows in the forests of Africa, was introduced to the world by the tribes who lived there.  The United States has begun to extract fuel from this grain.  Rye is the major crop in Tamil Nadu.  In the rural areas of southern Tamil Nadu it is called Kammambul.

Recent studies have shown that rye has the power to relieve stress.  It has also been found to contain drugs for vision and sexual dysfunction.  Rye is one of the most protein rich cereals.

Maize (White Millet):

Maize which came to India through Europeans is widely cultivated in Tamil Nadu.  There are many varieties of maize (white maize), black maize, sorghum, sorghum, maize and iron maize.  Country corn is a grain rich in flavor and nutrients.  Corn is a staple in the diet of Tamils. Corn is widely used during Pongal.

The aroma and taste of cornmeal are unhealthy in the southern district villages.  Foods made from corn are very good for diabetes.

Varago (Kodo Millet):

Varago has the ability to grow even in dry areas. The upper part of the grain is said to have seven layers.  Agronomists have found that its seeds have been sown for thousands of years.  Foods made in the fall can reduce obesity and brighten the eyes.  Corrects menstrual problems in women.

Agronomists insist that human food demand should not be calculated in terms of calories, but in small grains such as taro, millet, horsetail, quail, etc., which can be grown in rainfed sources of protein, good fats, minerals, and vitamins.

Raise awareness among the people about traditional small grain foods.  People need to come forward to use traditional small grain foods for our strong, healthy body. Central and state governments should be encouraged to become self-sufficient in small grain yields.  The future of the Indian economy and its offspring will be greatly benefited by small grain production and food.

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